Happy Halloween 2020!

 

Happy Halloween! This season has been sad and strange, but I loved seeing all the creativity and the Halloween community pull together.

Next year, hopefully, there will be a vaccine for Covid-19 and some normality will return. We’ll once again celebrate with trick or treating, big parties and bashes, and all the spooky fun we love and miss. Until then, if you’re still looking for ideas on ways to celebrate, check out my blog post from earlier this month, Halloween at Home.

Today is also the last day to enter the Halloween Haiku Challenge 2020. There’s still a chance to win a a free copy of Pumpkins and Party Themes by Roxanne Rhoads.


Don’t forget:

  • Look up, full Blue Moon tonight.
  • USA, we turn our clocks at 2am
  • Practice Social Distancing and Wear a Mask when necessary.
  • Keep those pumpkins lit til midnight!

Halloween Kristy 

 Have a safe and Happy Halloween!

 

Friday Fright Nightcaps: The Haunted Grey Lady

The last weekend of October is always bittersweet. We’ve been counting down since September (some of us since July) and now, with Halloween less than a day away, there’s a sense of melancholy. I’ve been trying to find a cocktail that express both my jubiliation of the holiday’s arrival and my sadness over the Halloween season coming to end. Somehow, I ended up creating my own variation of the chocolate martini.

Behold, The Haunted Grey Lady, an original drink recipe featuring Kraken Black Roast Coffee Rum.

The Haunted Grey Lady by Halloween Kristy

INGREDIENTS:

2 oz. Bailey’s Irish Cream Liqueur
1 oz. Godiva Chocolate Liqueur
.05 oz. Kraken Black Roast Coffee Rum
.05 oz. Vodka

Optional Garnish:
Chocolate Syrup
White Chocolate Shavings
Whipped Cream

The Haunted Grey Lady with White Chocolate Shavings

You make this drink as strong as you like it. If you want more kick, add 1 oz. of Vodka. If you want more chocolate, add 1 oz. chocolate liqueur or add more chocolate syrup inside the glass. You can even garnish with whipped cream, if that’s your thing.

The Haunted Grey Lady with Whipped Cream

The Kraken is what gives the drink it’s grey look. You can substitute ingredients with other brands of the liqueurs. I’m sure that’ll work just fine, but I wonder about the color. Please post your pics in Comments section or hit me up on Instagram or Twitter using @HalloweenHaiku9

The Haunted Grey Lady with White Chocolate

HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

Throwback Thursday: Night of the Comet

Night of the Comet (1984)

I saved the best for last.  If you ever hear a Cyndi Lauper song in a horror film, this is peak 80s in all its surreal neon day-glowiness!

At face value, Night of the Comet is a mindless mash-up of several low-budget B-movie horror Sci-fi gems from the 50-60s, but look closer, and you’ll see Writer-director Thom Eberhardt actually penned a smart, witty satire, in tribute of such fine films. The question asked, what happens when two valley girls are the only two people left after a comet wipes off everyone on the planet?  If your first guess was ‘they go mall shopping and then get attacked by zombies’, give yourself a prize!

Two sisters Regina and Samantha played by Catherine-Mary Stewart and Kelli Maroney, are more than just gum popping, ripped-denim, leg warmer wearing bimbos full of sass. As if!
They’re actually pretty smart, and they manage to fight off armed invaders with Uzis in a sinister turf war, blood-seeking evil scientists with one-foot in the grave, and of course, comet-induced flesh-eating zombies, that always seem to come outta nowhere, all while working through why always-absent daddy married that money-hungry bitch Doris.
Level one up for the ladies of the eighties!

It’s true, there’s a lot of “family drama” with our feather-haired heroes, and less zombies than an average Walking Dead episode these days, but there’s still plenty of fun-filled comedy and bursts of non-gory action.  That’s right, no gore in this one, which is probably while the movie missed its mark as a really great horror film, but horror fanatics can’t live on blood-splatter alone. We need something to break up the monotony. If your eighties Halloween movie marathon contains Nightmare on Elm Street, any Hellraisers or early Maniacs, or John Carpenter’s The Thing, consider throwing in this campy zombie romp as a breather. You’ll thank me later.

Happy Halloween, everyone!

Wicked Art Wednesdays: My Favorite Vintage Halloween Postcards

I love vintage Halloween postcards. I have collected a few over the years, but sadly, my financial situation keeps me from owning many more. Still, thanks to the world wide web, I can enjoy the beauty of all vintage Halloween postcards. Here’s a look at my favorites:

Ellen Clapsaddle, circa 1910-1913

Ellen Clapsaddle painted over 3,000 postcards in her lifetime, making her one of the Queens of the Postcards.

Ellen Clapsaddle, circa 1910-1913

Another favorite from Ellen Clapsaddle, which seems similar to the Ghost Pumpkinhead postcards seen below, but a completely different series.

Frances Brundage, circa 1910-1913

Frances Brundage loved to paint whimsical scenes of children with black cats and always added her signature red ribbon to the scene.

Frances Brundage, circa 1910-1913

Another fave from Frances Brundage. She was a hugely popular postcard artist and I consider her the other Queen of the Postcards.

ML Jackson, circa 1910-1913

ML Jackson painted this postcard from Charms of Witching Hour series. I don’t have any information on how many postcards are in this set.

ML Jackson, circa 1910-1913

Notice the similar cat from ML Jackson painting, which means he mostly likely painted the Halloween Don’ts postcard series too. I don’t have too much information on thid series but I believe there’s a six of them.

Samuel L. Schmucker, circa 1910-1913

Samuel L. Schmucker, who also went by his initials, S.L.S., liked to paint pretty ladies in all of his postcards.

Samuel L. Schmucker, circa 1910-1913

This one, also from Samuel L. Schmucker, seems quite racy for 1912.

Ellen Clapsaddle, circa 1910-1913

These next three are truly my favorites. They were most likely painted by Ellen Clapsaddle, but truth is, I haven’t been able to verify this information yet.

Ellen Clapsaddle, circa 1910-1913

Another of my absolute favorites most likely from Ellen Clapsaddle. These postcards seem similar to the Halloween Flying series seen above but they are different series altogether.

Ellen Clapsaddle, circa 1910-1913

This is my absolute favorite postcard in the whole wide world. Why? I’m not even sure. I guess, I just love this little character. I do own this postcard and another from the series. I’m always on the hunt for more.

Do you have a favorite vintage Halloween postcard? Let me know in the Comments section or hit me up on Instagram and Twitter @HalloweenHaiku9

Trick or Treat Tuesday: Come visit the graveyard

Will you get a treat or a trick?

Click on each tomb for a spooky surprise! (Some have sound, turn up your speakers.)

I hope you had fun sprinting through in the graveyard. I’m new at making these little videos. Self-taught. I promise I’ll get better at it. 🙂

HAVE A HAPPY HALLOWEEK!

Monday Macabre

pumpkins seeds
the veil is thinning
halloweek

Poe Sunday: The Black Cat

Poe Sundays are all about honoring the works of Edgar Allan Poe. The Black Cat can be a tough read for many, as there’s quite a bit of animal cruelty, but that does play a part in the story and why it’s considered one of the most frightening short stories ever written. This blog does not condone the act of animal cruelty, nor do I believe that was the author’s intention.

The Black Cat
by Edgar Allan Poe
(published 1845
)

For the most wild, yet most homely narrative which I am about to pen, I neither expect nor solicit belief. Mad indeed would I be to expect it, in a case where my very senses reject their own evidence. Yet, mad am I not — and very surely do I not dream. But to-morrow I die, and to-day I would unburthen my soul. My immediate purpose is to place before the world, plainly, succinctly, and without comment, a series of mere household events. In their consequences, these events have terrified — have tortured — have destroyed me. Yet I will not attempt to expound them. To me, they have presented little but Horror — to many they will seem less terrible than barroques. Hereafter, perhaps, some intellect may be found which will reduce my phantasm to the common-place — some intellect more calm, more logical, and far less excitable than my own, which will perceive, in the circumstances I detail with awe, nothing more than an ordinary succession of very natural causes and effects.

From my infancy I was noted for the docility and humanity of my disposition. My tenderness of heart was even so conspicuous as to make me the jest of my companions. I was especially fond of animals, and was indulged by my parents with a great variety of pets. With these I spent most of my time, and never was so happy as when feeding and caressing them. This peculiarity of character grew with my growth, and, in my manhood, I derived from it one of my principal sources of pleasure. To those who have cherished an affection for a faithful and sagacious dog, I need hardly be at the trouble of explaining the nature or the intensity of the gratification thus derivable. There is something in the unselfish and self-sacrificing love of a brute, which goes directly to the heart of him who has had frequent occasion to test the paltry friendship and gossamer fidelity of mere Man.

I married early, and was happy to find in my wife a disposition not uncongenial with my own. Observing my partiality for domestic pets, she lost no opportunity of procuring those of the most agreeable kind. We had birds, gold-fish, a fine dog, rabbits, a small monkey, and a cat.

This latter was a remarkably large and beautiful animal, entirely black, and sagacious to an astonishing degree. In speaking of his intelligence, my wife, who at heart was not a little tinctured with superstition, made frequent allusion to the ancient popular notion, which regarded all black cats as witches in disguise. Not that she was ever serious upon this point — and I mention the matter at all for no better reason than that it happens, just now, to be remembered.

Pluto — this was the cat’s name — was my favorite pet and playmate. I alone fed him, and he attended me wherever I went about the house. It was even with difficulty that I could prevent him from following me through the streets.

Our friendship lasted, in this manner, for several years, during which my general temperament and character — through the instrumentality of the Fiend Intemperance — had (I blush to confess it) experienced a radical alteration for the worse. I grew, day by day, more moody, more irritable, more regardless of the feelings of others. I suffered myself to use intemperate language to my wife. At length, I even offered her personal violence. My pets, of course, were made to feel the change in my disposition. I not only neglected, but ill-used them. For Pluto, however, I still retained sufficient regard to restrain me from maltreating him, as I made no scruple of maltreating the rabbits, the monkey, or even the dog, when by accident, or through affection, they came in my way. But my disease grew upon me — for what disease is like Alcohol ! — and at length even Pluto, who was now becoming old, and consequently somewhat peevish — even Pluto began to experience the effects of my ill temper.

One night, returning home, much intoxicated, from one of my haunts about town, I fancied that the cat avoided my presence. I seized him; when, in his fright at my violence, he inflicted a slight wound upon my hand with his teeth. The fury of a demon instantly possessed me. I knew myself no longer. My  original soul seemed, at once, to take its flight from my body; and a more than fiendish malevolence, gin-nurtured, thrilled every fibre of my frame. I took from my waistcoat-pocket a pen-knife, opened it, grasped the poor beast by the throat, and deliberately cut one of its eyes from the socket! I blush, I burn, I shudder, while I pen the damnable atrocity.

When reason returned with the morning — when I had slept off the fumes of the night’s debauch — I experienced a sentiment half of horror, half of remorse, for the crime of which I had been guilty; but it was, at best, a feeble and equivocal feeling, and the soul remained untouched. I again plunged into excess, and soon drowned in wine all memory of the deed.

Continue reading “Poe Sunday: The Black Cat”

Halloween Haiku Challenge 2020 – Last Week to Submit Entries

There’s one week left to submit those entries for 2nd Annual Halloween Haiku Challenge. Details about the entire contest can be found here. You can submit in the comment section or via Instagram or Twitter. Just don’t forget to use tag #HalloweenHaikuChallenge2020 and tag me @HalloweenHaiku9 so I see your post.

Winning haiku gets a free copy of Pumpkins and Party Themes: 50 DIY Designs to Bring Your Halloween Extravaganza to Life by Roxanne Rhoads of A Bewitching Guide to Halloween. This awesome book has amazing photos, party ideas and 50 DIY designs, a must-have for Halloween fans.

Sinister Saturday: Killer Halloween Playlists

I have no rant this week, only melancholy because there’s only one week til Halloween night. It makes me sad seeing the spooky season come to an end so soon. Yet, like baseball, there’s no crying on Halloween. The dead only have one night in this realm and they don’t wanna listen to us weeping. Halloween is for celebration!

So, I finally jumped on the playlist bandwagon to pick out some killer Halloween party music* or dance around in your room when no one is looking music. There are no judges here, only ghouls who wanna have a good time. Enjoy!

*Don’t be surprised if playlists change or more playlists are added. Check back regularly.