Friday Fright Nightcaps – Zombtini

Who doesn’t love a good zombie story?  Today, we celebrate the return of Columbus, Tallahassee, Wichita and Little Rock, a group of survivors struggling to stay alive in zombie ravaged America, in the horror-comedy Zombieland: Double Tap.

Let’s be honest, most Americans feel like total zombies at the end of long work week. We could use a good pick-me-up to bring back some color to our cheeks. The folks over at Totally the Bomb know what it takes to blow us away with a great new take on the classic martini. May I present, the Zombtini

zombtini
Zombtini Photos by TotallytheBomb.com

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz. Captain Morgan White Rum
  • 2 oz. Dekuyper Melon Liqueur
  • 1 oz. 100% Pineapple Juice
  • 0.5 oz. Sprite
  • Dash of Grenadine (garnish)
zombtini 3
Zombtini Photos by TotallytheBomb.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For full mixing instructions, please go here: https://totallythebomb.com/make-your-own-zombtini

For those of you with one foot in the grave, remember to drink responsibly.

Copy of Friday Fright Nightcaps

The Witch’s Tale, American Radio’s First Horror Show

The Witch’s Tale was the first horror-fantasy radio series, which aired from May 28, 1931, to June 13, 1938, on WOR, the Mutual Radio Network, and later in syndication. Creator Alonzo Deen Cole, a 34-year old Minnesota native, convinced the station to air the supernatural series that he wrote and directed himself. His goal was to draw audiences away from more conventional musical shows airing on rival stations.

Witchs_Tale_1The creepy 30-minute weekly anthology featured a cackling host named Old Nancy, a witch from Salem, who, along with her wise black cat named Satan, spun a new wicked “bedtime yarn” each week. The show terrified younger listeners and was a huge success with New York children, who adored Old Nancy, often imitating her cackles and quips, in efforts to scare younger siblings.

The shows were broadcast live, recorded for syndication, and then distributed to various national markets. It’s reported, that in 1961, Cole didn’t think the recordings held any value, so he destroyed nearly all of them (only about 30-50 recordings exist today).

Witchs Tale trio
Most scripts were original stories but there were a few literary adaptions as well. Cole played the cat Satan and enlisted the aid of his wife Marie O’Flynn to play lead female characters. Old Nancy, liked telling tales was created by stage actress Adelaide Fitz-Allen, who portrayed the spooky witch until her death in 1935.Auditions were held soon after to find a new Old Nancy and 13-year old Miriam Wolfe, a radio prodigy from Brooklyn, New York was chosen for the role after Cole heard the girl mimicking the character’s trademark cackling laugh. Wolfe would play the character for several years, in addition to other characters, before leaving to pursue other interests. Veteran radio and film actress Martha Wentworth (the famed Disney voice artist) then stepped in to lend her voice talents as Old Nancy. Top New York radio actors were often cast to fill roles of secondary characters respectively.

 

 

 

 

In 1936, a companion magazine called The Witch’s Tales was published by the small firm, Carwood Publishing Co., which reportedly failed to promote the radio show properly and completely mismanaged finances and distribution of the magazine. Only two issues (November and December) ever made it into print. Although Alonzo Deen Cole was named editor, real editorial work was believed to be done by Tom Chadburn. Cole did, however, write the lead story for the first issue and contributed the plot for the main story in the second issue. The magazine’s other stories were all reprints from the American version of Pearson’s Magazine. 

The spell cast by The Witch’s Tale came to an end in 1958, with talk of bringing the series to television. Cole was eyed as a consultant and story supervisor for the pilot, but the idea never came to fruition.

You can find many episodes over at Archive.org: https://archive.org/details/TheWitchsTale

The video shown below is titled Graveyard Mansion, originally aired in 1934, about two brothers who may have stumbled upon a New Orleans vampire. Take a listen.

Wicked Art Wednesdays – Robb Mommaerts

Hailing from the midwest, uber-talented illustrator/graphic designer Robb Mommaerts, started drawing at the tender age of two, finding inspiration in Disney, Looney Tunes, the Muppets, children’s books and comics. He spent many years working as a professional graphic designer before setting out on his own in freelance illustration, creating for such companies as Cryptozoic, Boom! Entertainment, and Image Comics, just to name a few.

ween_racers_ink_blog rmommaerts

Website: http://robbvision.blogspot.com/
Deviant Art Gallery: https://www.deviantart.com/robbvision/gallery
Social Media: https://www.instagram.com/robbmommaerts and https://twitter.com/robbmommaerts1

Why we love them: Robb Mommaerts loves monsters.  The creator of Robbvision (currently on hiatus) cites Halloween as his second favorite holiday, next to Christmas (btw, you should totally check out his Xmas work). Robb’s images capture the whimsical fun of Halloween and feature zany characters that both adults and children can love.

Tuesday Terror – Curse of Frankenstein

Curse of Frankenstein (1957)
I’ve harmed nobody, just robbed a few graves!

curse 3
Curse of Frankstein ©Hammer Film Productions

Hammer Film’s first incursion into the Frankenstein mythos, Curse of Frankenstein, spawned several sequels, all of them starring soon-to-be horror icon Peter Cushing as Victor Frankenstein.  Directed by Terence Fisher, in what would be the first of many films that Fisher would make for Hammer Films, the film also starred a young Christopher Lee, playing the Monster, before he would go on to don Dracula’s cape for the next three decades.

Universal Films fought vehemently to protect their own Frankenstein film and its rights, which reflected heavily on many decisions Hammer made during filming. Make-up artist Phil Leaky created a brand-new look for the monster, and several key scenes from the novel were cut due to a limited budget. Despite its limitations, Curse of Frankenstein impressed many with its art direction, costuming, camera work, and the stellar cast, which also included English actor Hazel Court, (just starting out in her lengthy career as a horror queen), and Scottish stage and TV actor Robert Urquhart.

 

This story revolves around Frankenstein himself, rather than his creature, choosing to show the Baron as a more ambitious, egotistical and ruthless man; at the start of the story, he awaits execution for several murders. Hammer’s version of Dr. Frankenstein is a villainous man, willing to commit crimes, set up a man’s accidental death, aka murder, to obtain the parts he needs to create his creature, and even use the poor creature to kill opponents standing in the way of greatness. Since, the brain was damaged, it becomes apparent quickly that the monster has little intelligence and is too far too violent to control, thus, Frankenstein is forced to destroy his greatest creation. With the evidence gone, fate comes down to his younger associate Dr. Paul Krempe, the only witness to the experiments.

curse
©Hammer Film Productions

Colin Clive may have had the most memorable line in horror history, but it was Peter Cushing who was highly praised for the truly unforgettable performance of Victor Frankenstein, for fleshing out the character that audiences deemed charming and intriguing, in spite of his villainy. It was Cushing that helped inspire the mad scientist archetype and motivated Hammer to continue his story all the way into the 70s.

Curse of Frankenstein was Hammer’s first color film and considered by many to be the first truly gory film. The deep red blood and guts appeared gorier on screen than any other horror film of its time, causing a bit of uproar and scathing reviews. It even received an X rating for a time, when it opened at the London Pavilion in 1957. Despite receiving the lukewarm reviews from critics, audiences seemed to really like the film, grossing nearly $8 million, thus, putting Hammer Films squarely on the map.

curseoffrankensteinposter
Curse of Frankstein ©Hammer Film Productions

 

Haiku of the Week

broken stone
a lover, taken too soon
empty grave

Poe Sundays

darkcrypt

The Sleeper
by Edgar Allan Poe
(published 1831)

At midnight, in the month of June,
I stand beneath the mystic moon.
An opiate vapor, dewy, dim,
Exhales from out her golden rim,
And, softly dripping, drop by drop,
Upon the quiet mountain top,
Steals drowsily and musically
Into the universal valley.
The rosemary nods upon the grave;
The lily lolls upon the wave;
Wrapping the fog about its breast,
The ruin molders into rest;
Looking like Lethe, see! the lake
A conscious slumber seems to take,
And would not, for the world, awake.
All Beauty sleeps!- and lo! where lies
Irene, with her Destinies!

O, lady bright! can it be right-
This window open to the night?
The wanton airs, from the tree-top,
Laughingly through the lattice drop-
The bodiless airs, a wizard rout,
Flit through thy chamber in and out,
And wave the curtain canopy
So fitfully- so fearfully-
Above the closed and fringed lid
‘Neath which thy slumb’ring soul lies hid,
That, o’er the floor and down the wall,
Like ghosts the shadows rise and fall!
Oh, lady dear, hast thou no fear?
Why and what art thou dreaming here?
Sure thou art come O’er far-off seas,
A wonder to these garden trees!
Strange is thy pallor! strange thy dress,
Strange, above all, thy length of tress,
And this all solemn silentness!

The lady sleeps! Oh, may her sleep,
Which is enduring, so be deep!
Heaven have her in its sacred keep!
This chamber changed for one more holy,
This bed for one more melancholy,
I pray to God that she may lie
For ever with unopened eye,
While the pale sheeted ghosts go by!

My love, she sleeps! Oh, may her sleep
As it is lasting, so be deep!
Soft may the worms about her creep!
Far in the forest, dim and old,
For her may some tall vault unfold-
Some vault that oft has flung its black
And winged panels fluttering back,
Triumphant, o’er the crested palls,
Of her grand family funerals-

Some sepulchre, remote, alone,
Against whose portal she hath thrown,
In childhood, many an idle stone-
Some tomb from out whose sounding door
She ne’er shall force an echo more,
Thrilling to think, poor child of sin!
It was the dead who groaned within.

 

Sinister Saturdays – Vampire Chocolate Mousse Parfait

Vampires. Creatures of the night. Tortured souls doomed to walk the earth for eternity. No other archetype in horror has captured our fantasy like the powerful vampire, with that insatiable hunger that drives the frenzied brain in search of prey. From the dark corners of alleys, all the way to highest chambers of royal castles, bloodlust is their curse, and to that, I say… too bad, so sad, more chocolate for us!

The mighty hunter, the Vintage Kitchen Chef has created a decadent dessert worthy of eternal worship, Vampire Chocolate Mousse Parfaits.

Vampire-Chcoclate.jmousse1
Photos ©The Vintage Kitchen

Ingredients:

For The Mousse:
  • 4 oz Chocolate Baking Bar, White Chocolate; broken into pieces (or any high quality white baking chocolate)
  • 4 oz. Chocolate Baking Bar, Semi-Sweet Chocolate; broken into pieces (or any high quality semi-sweet baking chocolate)
  • 1 1/3 cup heavy cream
  • 2 eggs, separated
  • Black food coloring
  • Wilton rose icing decorations; optional
For The Edible Blood:
  • 1/2 cup light corn syrup
  • 1 Tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1-2 Tablespoons chocolate syrup
  • 1 tsp. cocoa
  • Red food coloring

For full recipe and instructions, please go here:
https://www.thevintagekitchenchef.com/vampire-chocolate-mousse-parfaits/

 

Like a stake through the heart, this recipe might be the death of you. But, that’s okay, because you’ll have a smile on your face when you go.

Friday Fright Nightcaps – The Walking Dead Cocktail

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, The Walking Dead returned this past week for its tenth season. The Walking Dead comics, once considered too complicated for mainstream television, now inspire pop culture in ways, we haven’t seen since the Romero’s horror hit masterpiece, Night of the Living Dead. 

Last season divided fans, but with a new spin-off show in the works, in addition to the already popular, Fear the Walking Dead, there’s no denying that we like zombie TV. So, grab your cocktail shaker and let’s celebrate with Kat Balog’s crazy take on an old classic cocktail, The Walking Dead Cocktail.

walking-dead-zombie-cocktail-
Photo ©Kat Balog

Ingredients:

1-1/2 oz vodka
1 oz Kahlua
2 oz cream
1 tbsp caramel topping
1 tbsp. fudge topping
Ice

Blood:
– 3 tbsp Simple syrup
– 2 drops Red food coloring

For mixing instructions, please go here: https://katbalogger.com/the-walking-dead-zombie-cocktail

TWD cocktail
Photo ©Kat Balog

Vintage Halloween Collectibles Wish List

Do you love Halloween Memorabilia? Do you wish all the money in the world belonged to you so you could buy Halloween collectibles? Join the club!

I adore the vintage Halloween style. I especially love old Halloween antiques, but true Halloween collectibles are pricey, leaving many of us out in the cold. Interest in Halloween yesteryears has spawned a growing sidearm in the Halloween retail industry, replica vintage Halloween décor. Beistle Company, which started out in 1900 making paper products, was one of the very first companies to make Halloween decorations and party goods. Today, they make replica items of their very own designs! Pretty genius.

There is one downside however, and that’s if you’re a serious collector who wants real vintage merchandise, you might have a tougher time finding authentic vintage memorabilia. Those who wish to get into collecting vintage Halloween items, you need to do your homework. Learn the business, the items, the creators, the prices, even the people who deal in collectible market. Many of them are quite nice and always willing to answer questions or help out with their vast knowledge of Halloween history.

There are tons of guides out there. Two of my favorite comprehensive guides are Vintage Halloween Collectibles, 3rd Edition by Mark B. Ledenbach, and the newly published, Vintage Hallowe’en: Tricks, Treats & Traditions authored and created Robert S. Pandis and Heidi Pandis.

 

Everyone has different preferences in the type of Halloween collectibles, they’d like to own. Below is my own personal wish list.  Feel free to chime in on the comments below or hit me up on Twitter and Instagram and let me know what’s on your list.

Vintage Postcards, 1910s
($5-$100) **

Vintage postcards and other ephemera can be found at paper shows and antique shops. Prices vary based on condition and rarity of the piece.

 

Beistle Embossed Die Cut – Black Cats and Moon,
($20-$100) **

Authentic Halloween Die Cuts  are usually thick cardboard and embossed, always check the back. Prices vary based on condition and rarity of the piece.

 

Gurley Novelty Co. Halloween Candles, 1950s
($15-$80) **

I posted a pic on Instagram on October 8, 2019 that shows the solo black cat below, but in really bad shape. I’d love to get another one and more like it.

 

Dennison’s Bogie Book, 1920
($30-$150) **

This is a pic of the original Hallowe’en, Harvest and Thanksgiving party planning guide. There are many Bogie Books from Dennison’s floating around. The 1920 version is supposedly in public domain, which means anyone can copy, reprint and sell them. If you just want the information, cool, but understand, you’re not buying an antique.  I’ve seen authentic originals sell upwards of $150.

Dennisons Bogie Book Collectible 1925

Anton Reiche Dresden Witch or Pumpkin Chocolate Molds, 1930s
($25-$350) **

If you’re a chocolate lover, you might enjoy checking out this history of chocolate molds from Germany, at http://www.chocolatemoldsmuseum.com/history/chocolate-molds/    Friedrich Anton Reiche from Dresden made lots of chocolate molds for several holidays, including these two below for Halloween.

 

Rosbro Halloween Snowman Candy Container, 1950s
($75-$250) **

There are hundreds of collectible Halloween candy containers from either Rosen/Rosbro or Kokomold to search out if you’re looking to get into collecting those (I hear the Kokomold witch rocket on wheels are extremely rare and valuable), but I particularly adore these Halloween Snowmen.

vintage halloween snowman

Vintage Horror Movie Posters, 1930s
($1500-$435,500) **

According to this Guardian article from 2012, The Mummy film poster from 1932 comes in as the second most expensive film poster of all-time, behind the Sci-fi thriller, Metropolis from 1927, which recently auctioned off for $1.2 million, along with other memorabilia in a bankruptcy deal.

Mummy Film Poster 1932

**All prices are only estimates from the lowest to highest auctions that I’ve seen.

Wicked Art Wednesdays – Drew Rausch

Artist and comic creator Drew Rausch is our go-to guy for all things spooky AND weird. I’ve had the pleasure of meeting him a couple of times at horror shows and in addition to being uber-talented and crazy busy, he’s super nice and funny. Drew is co-creator of the webcomic My Blacks don’t match, with Jocelyn Gajeway, Eldritch! with Aaron Alexovich, and the subculture comic Sullengray, also co-written with Jocelyn Gajeway. His work can be seen in Boom Studios’ Cthulhu and Zombie Tales, SLG’s Haunted Mansion, IDW’s Edwards Scissorhands, and many more.

DrewRausch CampfireGhostStory
©Drew Rausch

Artist: Drew Rausch
Where to Purchase Goods: Online store, Comic and horror conventions, gallery shows, and special events
Website: https://drewrausch.com or https://drewrausch.bigcartel.com/
Social Media: https://www.instagram.com/drewrausch

 

HalloweenCatPin
©Drew Rausch

Why we love them: Based on my few convos with him, Drew is just like any of us, a big ‘ole Halloweenophile, comics fan, music lover, classic horror movie buff and lover of all things spooky and weird.  Whether he’s drawing webcomics or creating cool pins of offbeat characters he’s dreamt up, one can clearly see the influences of comics, monsters, and classic horror movies in his artwork.  Plus, he still takes commissions from time to time, when he’s not busy (which is almost never, so be patient, but his art is totally worth the wait.)