Wicked Art Wednesdays: My Favorite Vintage Halloween Postcards

I love vintage Halloween postcards. I have collected a few over the years, but sadly, my financial situation keeps me from owning many more. Still, thanks to the world wide web, I can enjoy the beauty of all vintage Halloween postcards. Here’s a look at my favorites:

Ellen Clapsaddle, circa 1910-1913

Ellen Clapsaddle painted over 3,000 postcards in her lifetime, making her one of the Queens of the Postcards.

Ellen Clapsaddle, circa 1910-1913

Another favorite from Ellen Clapsaddle, which seems similar to the Ghost Pumpkinhead postcards seen below, but a completely different series.

Frances Brundage, circa 1910-1913

Frances Brundage loved to paint whimsical scenes of children with black cats and always added her signature red ribbon to the scene.

Frances Brundage, circa 1910-1913

Another fave from Frances Brundage. She was a hugely popular postcard artist and I consider her the other Queen of the Postcards.

ML Jackson, circa 1910-1913

ML Jackson painted this postcard from Charms of Witching Hour series. I don’t have any information on how many postcards are in this set.

ML Jackson, circa 1910-1913

Notice the similar cat from ML Jackson painting, which means he mostly likely painted the Halloween Don’ts postcard series too. I don’t have too much information on thid series but I believe there’s a six of them.

Samuel L. Schmucker, circa 1910-1913

Samuel L. Schmucker, who also went by his initials, S.L.S., liked to paint pretty ladies in all of his postcards.

Samuel L. Schmucker, circa 1910-1913

This one, also from Samuel L. Schmucker, seems quite racy for 1912.

Ellen Clapsaddle, circa 1910-1913

These next three are truly my favorites. They were most likely painted by Ellen Clapsaddle, but truth is, I haven’t been able to verify this information yet.

Ellen Clapsaddle, circa 1910-1913

Another of my absolute favorites most likely from Ellen Clapsaddle. These postcards seem similar to the Halloween Flying series seen above but they are different series altogether.

Ellen Clapsaddle, circa 1910-1913

This is my absolute favorite postcard in the whole wide world. Why? I’m not even sure. I guess, I just love this little character. I do own this postcard and another from the series. I’m always on the hunt for more.

Do you have a favorite vintage Halloween postcard? Let me know in the Comments section or hit me up on Instagram and Twitter @HalloweenHaiku9

The Samhain Society Presents Halloween 2020

Check out this stunning new digital zine from the creative talents of The Samhain Society, designed by Jackie Cheuvront of Eclipse Afterglow Studios and edited by Miranda Enzor of Spooky Little Halloween, featuring a collection of artworks, DIY projects, recipes, short stories, and more!

I am so honored to be part of such a creative collaboration with the most talented group of artists, writers and creators in the Halloween community. Click on link below or the picture.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1shrqnEmTVTzl4MRXSbnUM0eEfx2w7or0/view?fbclid=IwAR3lJskeZ6uI_OA1EviNOHyK3T3LUE1IGE-9rxZgECCr9TR1Xa1KZ0PDtCU

Vintage Halloween Collectibles Wish List

Do you love Halloween Memorabilia? Do you wish all the money in the world belonged to you so you could buy Halloween collectibles? Join the club!

I adore the vintage Halloween style. I especially love old Halloween antiques, but true Halloween collectibles are pricey, leaving many of us out in the cold. Interest in Halloween yesteryears has spawned a growing sidearm in the Halloween retail industry, replica vintage Halloween décor. Beistle Company, which started out in 1900 making paper products, was one of the very first companies to make Halloween decorations and party goods. Today, they make replica items of their very own designs! Pretty genius.

There is one downside however, and that’s if you’re a serious collector who wants real vintage merchandise, you might have a tougher time finding authentic vintage memorabilia. Those who wish to get into collecting vintage Halloween items, you need to do your homework. Learn the business, the items, the creators, the prices, even the people who deal in collectible market. Many of them are quite nice and always willing to answer questions or help out with their vast knowledge of Halloween history.

There are tons of guides out there. Two of my favorite comprehensive guides are Vintage Halloween Collectibles, 3rd Edition by Mark B. Ledenbach, and the newly published, Vintage Hallowe’en: Tricks, Treats & Traditions authored and created Robert S. Pandis and Heidi Pandis.

 

Everyone has different preferences in the type of Halloween collectibles, they’d like to own. Below is my own personal wish list.  Feel free to chime in on the comments below or hit me up on Twitter and Instagram and let me know what’s on your list.

Vintage Postcards, 1910s
($5-$100) **

Vintage postcards and other ephemera can be found at paper shows and antique shops. Prices vary based on condition and rarity of the piece.

 

Beistle Embossed Die Cut – Black Cats and Moon,
($20-$100) **

Authentic Halloween Die Cuts  are usually thick cardboard and embossed, always check the back. Prices vary based on condition and rarity of the piece.

 

Gurley Novelty Co. Halloween Candles, 1950s
($15-$80) **

I posted a pic on Instagram on October 8, 2019 that shows the solo black cat below, but in really bad shape. I’d love to get another one and more like it.

 

Dennison’s Bogie Book, 1920
($30-$150) **

This is a pic of the original Hallowe’en, Harvest and Thanksgiving party planning guide. There are many Bogie Books from Dennison’s floating around. The 1920 version is supposedly in public domain, which means anyone can copy, reprint and sell them. If you just want the information, cool, but understand, you’re not buying an antique.  I’ve seen authentic originals sell upwards of $150.

Dennisons Bogie Book Collectible 1925

Anton Reiche Dresden Witch or Pumpkin Chocolate Molds, 1930s
($25-$350) **

If you’re a chocolate lover, you might enjoy checking out this history of chocolate molds from Germany, at http://www.chocolatemoldsmuseum.com/history/chocolate-molds/    Friedrich Anton Reiche from Dresden made lots of chocolate molds for several holidays, including these two below for Halloween.

 

Rosbro Halloween Snowman Candy Container, 1950s
($75-$250) **

There are hundreds of collectible Halloween candy containers from either Rosen/Rosbro or Kokomold to search out if you’re looking to get into collecting those (I hear the Kokomold witch rocket on wheels are extremely rare and valuable), but I particularly adore these Halloween Snowmen.

vintage halloween snowman

Vintage Horror Movie Posters, 1930s
($1500-$435,500) **

According to this Guardian article from 2012, The Mummy film poster from 1932 comes in as the second most expensive film poster of all-time, behind the Sci-fi thriller, Metropolis from 1927, which recently auctioned off for $1.2 million, along with other memorabilia in a bankruptcy deal.

Mummy Film Poster 1932

**All prices are only estimates from the lowest to highest auctions that I’ve seen.